the house at the end of the street is on fire

What is a home? And what if you don’t have one? These are the questions we wanted to explore in our book: the house at the end of the street is on fire.
Author Lucius Pham holds up storyboards from the house at the end of the street is on fire.
Illustrator Emma Kerr holds up storyboards from the house at the end of the street is on fire.

The story follows a young girl and her father as they adapt to recent tragedy. When we first meet Kiera, she is overwhelmed––face illuminated by the glow of her burning home. All she can do is watch as her possessions and memories go up in flames. Her father, also juggling the responsibilities and emotions of single parenthood, is suddenly burdened with the realities of homelessness and forced to deal with the adult side of disaster: insurance, bills, phone calls, paperwork, etc. As the two shuffle from house to house, supported in their time of need by family and friends, Kiera considers what really matters. What makes a home?

We focus on the themes of loss and healing and fixate on the moments in between. Big change can happen very quickly. There is likely no ruder reminder of this fact than losing one’s home. We wrote this story during a period of tremendous loss, worldwide. Every day, it seems, serves as a reminder of life’s uncertainty and death’s persistence. While the house at the end of the street is on fire was designed for children, its message is universal. It’s about moving forward, coping with loss and understanding what’s important.

Written by: Lucius Pham

Illustrations: Emma Kerr

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